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Full text of "Annual report of the Metropolitan District Commission"

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ANNUAL 
REPORT 



y O70 



FISCAL YEAR 
ENDING JUNE 30, 1972 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/annualreportofme19712mass 





20 <J&me**et Street, Sv&M&n/ 02/CS 



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To the Honorable Senate 

and House of Representatives: 



The Metropolitan District Commission presents herewith a 
report on activities and other pertinent data for the fiscal 
year ending June 30, 1972, in accordance with the provisions 
of Section 100 of Chapter 92 of the General Laws. 

An abstract of receipts, expenditures, disbursements, 
assets and liabilities was submitted earlier. The Commission 
has also filed legislation previously to be considered by the 
1973 session of the General Court, as required by Chapter 30, 
Section 33. 

sspectfully submitted, 




cSUAyO 



)HN W. SEARS 
:ommissioner 



COMMISSION, OFFICIALS AND EMPLOYEES 

JOHN W. SEARS 
Commissioner 

Associate Commissioners 
JOHN A. CRONIN 
JOHN F. HAGGERTY 
ARTHUR T. LYMAN, JR. 
VINCENT P. O'BRIEN 

RICHARD I. FURBUSH 
Secretary of the Commission 

MARTIN F. COSGROVE 
Administrative Engineer 

Executive Assistants 

JOHN J. BEADES 

JOHN W. FRENNING 

JAMES T. O'DONNELL 

DIVISION DIRECTORS 



FRANCIS T. BERGIN 

Chief Engineer 

Engineering Division 



ALLAN GRIEVE, JR. 
Director of Water Division 
Chief Water Supply Engineer 



LAURENCE J. CARPENTER 
Superintendent of Police 



ALLISON C. HAYES 
Director of Sewerage Division 
Chief Sewerage Engineer 



MASON J. CONDON 
Director of Parks Engineering 



WILLIAM T. KENNEY 

Acting Director 

Parks & Recreation Division 



Totals of permanent and temporary employees as of June 30, 1972, and 
June 30, 1971, were as follows: 

1972 1971 

Permanent Temporary Total Permanent Temporary Total 



Administration 


58 


Engineering 


268 


Highway Engineering 


— 


Parks & Parks Eng. 


657 


Sewerage 


454 


Water 


531 


Police 


613 


TOTALS 


2581 



8 


66 


__ 


268 


44 


44 


1017 


1674 


2 


456 


77 


608 


— 


613 



62 


6 


68 


246 


— 


246 


— 


44 


44 


684 


1297 


1981 


453 


13 


466 


555 


80 


635 


625 


— 


625 



1148 



3729 



2625 



1440 



4065 



PUBLICATION OF THIS DOCUMKNT APPROVED BY ALFRED C. HOLLAND, STATE PURCHASING AGENT. 



1500^-74-091738 



Est. Cost $.805 



The Challenge 



A fresh outburst of interest in re- 
gional solutions for public needs has 
posed a growing challenge to the Metro- 
politan District Commission. 

The 1972 fiscal year brought a bigger 
role in functions traditionally linked 
with the MDC area-wide concept applying 
to recreation, open spaces, water supply, 
pollution control, sewerage, law enforce- 
ment and traffic. 

Pressures mounted for expanding recre- 
ation facilities to fill expanding leisure 
time of adults and to provide wholesome 
outlets for young people seeking activity. 

Awareness of the environment has never 
been greater, spurring intensive and 
costly clean-water efforts in rivers, 
lakes, ponds and Boston Harbor and pre- 
serving and acquiring open spaces. 

Steadily-rising water use has widened 
the gap between safe watershed yield and 
consumption, intensifying the urgency for 
developing additional water supply 
sources. 

Traditional growth of MDC's Water and 
Sewerage districts now faces the prospect 
of accelerated expansion to meet defi- 
cient municipal water supply, the need 
by more communities to connect with a 
regional sewage collection and treat- 
ment system and requirements for more 
complete wastewater treatment. 

These are some of the challenges in 
providing services to 54 municipalities 
with a combined population of 2,459,000 
people, or 43% of the State's popula- 
tion. The Sewerage District is made up 
of 43 cities and towns with 2,219,000 
inhabitants. The Parks District embraces 
37 communities and a population of 
2,025,000 and the Water District has 32 
members and 1,874,324 residents. 

Twenty-three municipalities are 
members of all three districts, 12 are 
served by two districts and 19 by one 
district. In all, 54 communities have 
joined one or more of the districts to 
make use of MDC services. 



Meeting the Challenge 

The MDC has moved aggressively to meet 
the expanding demand for regional services 
by implementing significant projects and 
activities, developing long-range plans 
and launching comprehensive studies. 

But a history-making leap forward in 
enhancing the environment and recreational 
life of Metropolitan Boston came from un- 
precedented funding legislation, which 
developed in late June of 1972 when 
Governor Francis W. Sargent submitted an 
environmental capital outlay proposal and 
the Legislature enacted the program which 
included $110 million bond issue funding 
for MDC projects . 

The authorization — largest single 
money measure in MDC history — opened the 
door to a big-scale cleaning of harbor and 
river waters, a broad recreational develop- 
ment program, acquisition of open space 
and comprehensive, long-range planning for 
the sewerage and water systems. It was 
estimated the cost to MDC districts may 
run as low as $31 million after Federal 
and State reimbursements. 

The funding legislation allocated $83 
million for pollution control, $24 million 
for the Parks District, $1 million for 
water system planning and $2 million for 
flood control. 

A separate measure provided $7 million 
for multi-faceted pollution abatement pro- 
jects on the Charles River, utilizing novel 
techniques. 

Before these bright horizons were opened, 
the challenge was being met in many direc- 
tions. 



More skating rinks and swimming pools 
materialized, along with athletic facili- 
ties, fishing spots and greater activity 
at Hatch Shell and Boston Harbor islands. 
Rehabilitation of the outmoded and worn- 
out Franklin Park Zoo was off to an impres- 
sive start. Gaps in geographical distri- 
bution of facilities were being filled, new 
recreation activities were devised and ex- 
isting facilities were given more intensive 
use . 



Progress was recorded in alleviating 
pollution in Boston Harbor and the 
Charles and Mystic rivers. 

Methods of augmenting water supply for 
the next decade and setting 50-year 
planning objectives were taking shape, as 
the principal supply source at Quabbin 
rose to a still-inadequate 70.7% of capa- 
city during a record wet year. And a 
seven-mile long tunnel to bolster the 
distribution system in the Boston and 
South Shore areas was nearing completion. 

Relief measures for harried motorists 
on certain choked traffic arteries were 
under study or nearing the construction 
stage, while opening of the new Neponset 
River Bridge between Boston and Quincy 
has helped South Shore traffic movement. 

Coping with the burden of law enforce- 
ment and traffic control, the Police 
Division has vigorously tackled the 
narcotic drug problem, responded to 
major civil disturbances with its new 
specially-trained tactical unit, stepped 
up Police Academy curriculum and acquired 



new- type equipment for highway safety. 

MDC ' s fiscal 1972 expenditure was 
$68,693,211, including $8,004,076 for 
state highway bond issue projects and 
flood control and other state-financed 
authorizations. This compared with 
$64,000,529 in 1971, of which $7,641,547 
came from state-financed bond issues. 

But the rise in cost of services to 
cities and towns was less than half of 
the estimated growth of municipal expen- 
ses affecting local tax rates in a five- 
year comparison for the 1967-71 period — 
27.9% for MDC and 59.5% for municipali- 
ties. In the same period county assess- 
ments mounted by 60.5% and MBTA assess- 
ments rose 135.6% in the MDC area. A 
breakdown of MDC assessments showed 
increases of 11.7% for the Water District, 
38.8% for Parks and 34.6% for Sewerage. 
The water rate remained constant at $120 
per million gallons, so the Water District 
rise simply reflected greater water con- 
sumption. Similarly, the sewer assess- 
ments, being based partially on capacity 
use, are affected by increased discharge 
into the svstem. 



The Goal . . . Improving Quality of Life 



The goal which the MDC has set for 
itself focuses on improving the quality 
of life for the residents of the Greater 
Boston Metropolitan Area. 

One aspect of this goal is to improve 
fundamental services — going beyond 
merely keeping pace with an expanding 
population. These services include 
better water, sewer, recreational and 
transportation systems, and a more com- 
prehensive and efficient police force. 



A second aspect is to preserve fast 
diminishing open space and to develop 
new recreation areas to offset the past 
era of relatively unplanned urban expan- 
sion. The acquisition of open land for 
public use is one of the most urgent 
requirements of any large metropolitan 
area. A land use plan must be developed 



as soon as possible in the metropolitan 
area . 

The third element of this goal is to 
improve the quality of water in our 
streams, ponds, rivers and in Boston 
Harbor, and there must be adequate pure 
water to drink and to use for recreation 
purposes. These waters, wetlands and 
coastal areas provide an essential 
habitat for birds and animals, for fish 
and shellfish and their interrelated 
food chains . 

This goal places a heavy responsibil- 
ity on the MDC, but it must be achieved 
if urban existence is to have its neces- 
sary balance of work, culture, recre- 
ation and tranquility. Our efforts will 
be achieved only with the support of an 
informed citizenry actively partici- 
pating in achieving environmental goals. 



TRENDS IN MDC CHARGES AND OTHER COSTS IN MDC AREA: 1967-1971 

Percentage Increase 

O 10 20 30 40 90 (O 70 80 90 100 IK) 120 IM HO 



Consumer 
Price Index 



Municipal 
Appropriations 



2 2.8«'< 



County 
Charges 



MBTA 
Charges 



Original 
Transit District 
(14 Cities/Towns) 

MDC CHARGES 

Water 



Parks 



Sewer 



Total 



59. 
60 


9% 
.5°/« 















135.6 % 



950% 







7% 


1 "• 




(Prepored with ossistonce of Massachusetts Taxpayers Foundation) 



New Facilities, Activities Expanding Recreation 



There has been no let-up in the growth 
of recreation needs by the recreation- 
oriented urban population of Metropolitan 
Boston. 

The MDC has tried to keep pace with 
this trend by building facilities, devis- 
ing new activities, making more intensive 
use of the existing system and acquiring 
additional open space. 

Progress has been achieved in many 
directions, such as expanding the network 
of skating rinks and swimming pools, sail- 
ing facilities, bicycle paths, rehabilita- 
tion of Franklin Park Zoo, off-season use 
of skating rinks, programming at Hatch 
Shell and at the newly-developed free 
Publick Theatre on the Charles, greater 



use of Boston Harbor islands, a variety of 
innovative activity and a land acquisition 
program. 

The biggest simultaneous development of 
skating rinks and swimming pools in MDC 
history was launched during the 1972 
fiscal year at an expenditure of $8 
million. Contracts totaling $5,142,000 
were awarded for four rinks, three pools 
and enclosure of three open-air rinks. 
Completion of these facilities boosts 
rinks to a total of 25 and pools to 19. 

Twelve of the system's rinks are en- 
closed. 

The facilities, widely scattered 
throughout the Parks District to serve 
regional purposes, included a rink and 



pool complex in Weymouth and rinks in 
Canton, Waltham and Lynn and pools in 
West Roxbury and Melrose. The rink 
enclosures and other improvements were 
for South Boston, Quincy and Hyde Park 
facilities. In the design stage were 
rinks in Boston's North End, North 
Cambridge and Medford, estimated to cost 
$3 million. 

ZOO TRANSFORMATION MOVING 

An encouraging start has been made 
toward transforming the outmoded 
Franklin Park Zoo into modern, dramatic 
and humane animal and bird exhibits. 

The rehabilitation program is being 
spearheaded by the Boston Zoological 
Society under a zoo management agreement 
initiated in 1970. The BZS also oper- 
ates MDC's Children Zoo at Franklin Park, 
Walter D. Stone Zoo in Stoneham and 
Trailside Museum in the Blue Hills 
Reservation, Milton. 

Contracts exceeding $1 million were 
awarded for reconstructing the range 
area and the dilapidated birdhouse, 
along with water, electrical and access 
road imp r o vemen t s . 

Featuring the range display are 
shallow dry moats replacing fences to 
permit unobstructed display of hooved 
animals in a free-running, natural 
atmosphere. 

Among other improvements completed 
were visitor service areas incorporating 
rest rooms, concessions and eating 
plazas, and two parking areas. 

In progress is a complete revamping of 
the old birdhouse into a walk-through 
flight cage for free-flying birdlife, 
supplemented by a system of landscaped 
pools for waterfowl, mammals and fish. 

Preliminary designs have been developed 
for a $15 million, innovative, outdoor- 
indoor structure for year-round operation, 
sprawling over 5 1/2 acres and creating 
natural settings for animal display through 
use of hidden moats and backgrounds. This 
concept is the keystone of plans for con- 
verting Franklin Park Zoo into one of the 
best in the country. 



At the Stone Zoo, a hilltop Children's 
Zoo has progressed to final plans and 
specifications for an exhibit of baby 
animals for youngsters to pet, touch and 
feed, similar to the popular Children's 
Zoo at Franklin Park. 

The MDC's 16-mile stretch of ocean- 
front was struck by February's northeast 
storm which damaged seawalls, roadways 
and parking areas and swept away huge 
quantities of sand at various beaches. 
Emergency repairs were completed and an 
overall $1.6 million restoration program 
was launched, financed by Federal disas- 
ter emergency funds. 

A consultant's study of -hydrology and 
erosion was initiated, seeking an answer 
to loss of sand from storms and tidal 
action, a problem that has plagued 
beaches for many years. 

Earlier, a scenic uplift was completed 
along Lynn Shore Drive in a $935,000 
treatment of Red Rock Park, the seawall, 
sidewalks and fences. 

WOLLASTON BEACH IMPROVEMENTS 

At Wo lias ton Beach, plans have been 
finalized for a revised concept to 
realign a 3000-foot stretch of Quincy 
Shore Drive, extending the southerly end 
of the beach and providing more parking 
and picnic areas. The project incorpor- 
ates environmental criteria for protect- 
ing Black's Creek marshes and tidal 
flats, which won favorable comment from 
the National Park Service and satisfied 
objections raised by conservationists. 

The 1971 season saw inauguration of a 
parking fee system at Nahant, Revere and 
Nantasket beaches, resulting in a mixed 
public reaction. The plan produced 
modest net revenue of $45,000 and MDC 
Police reported it resulted in more 
orderly traffic and parking, a marked 
reduction in thefts from automobiles and 
better beach conditions. 

An aesthetic and environmental boost 
was given to parks, parkways and water- 
ways, as MDC's biggest tree and shrub 
planting program went into its second 
year, bringing the total planting to 
nearly 8000 over the two-year period. 




UNIQUE YEAR-ROUND ZOO planned for Franklin Park is shown in inter 
ior concept sketch of African exhibit. The indoor-outdoor facility 
will display uncaged animals separated by moats. 



Among other progressing recreation 
projects were: 



BIG PARKS DISTRICT DEVELOPMENT 



--Completion of a 4 1/2-mile bicycle 
path on Charles River from Longfellow 
Bridge to Eliot Bridge in Cambridge, 
which ultimately will stretch nearly 
20 miles around the basin. 

--A recommendation by an advisory 
committee to locate a multi-million 
dollar indoor schoolboy track and sports 
facility at the Hal let Street dump on 
the banks of Neponset River in Boston's 
Neponset section. 

--Installation of floats and gangways 
at Lovell 's Island and newly-acquired 
Peddocks Island; restoration of a guard- 
house building at Peddocks, including 
sanitary facilities, and completion of 
an engineering study of the damaged 
Georges Island seawall. 



Just ahead is a massive recreational 
development program -- possibly the 
largest in MDC history -- kicked off by 
$24 million for the Parks District in 
the MDC's $110 million environmental 
capital outlay budget of 1972. 

A key phase of the funding is an $8 
million allocation for the year-round 
animal display structure at Franklin Park 
Zoo. Boston Zoological Society is ex- 
pected to raise $5 million additional and 
a $2 million grant will be sought from 
Federal sources. 

The funds also cleared the way for 
development of Mystic River Basin into a 
counterpart of the famed Charles River 
Basin, lined with marine, park and sports 
recreational facilities, at an estimated 



cost of $5 million. The basin was trans- 
formed in 1966 from unsightly, odorous 
tidal flats into a fresh water expanse by 
the new Amelia Earhart (Mystic) Dam. 

Expenditure of $1 million is slated 
for restoring historic Fort Independence 
on South Boston's Castle Island peninsula 
and recreational development of the sce- 
nic area. 

The environmental park projects int- 
clude a multi-million dollar program of 
other types of recreational development, 
open space acquisition, water quality 
improvement of Muddy River, Pines River, 
Alewife Brook, Mother Brook, Long Ditch 
and Neponaet River and flood control for 
streams in Quincy and Braintree. 

The funding measure also gave impetus 
to implementing other master plans for 
major park development designed to bring 
a wide variety of active and passive 
recreational opportunities to every 
section of the Parks District. 

These run the full gamut of recre- 
ational outlets -- low-keyed treatment of 
Cutler Park in Needham stressing preser- 
vation of its natural state .. .restoration 
of the once great Riverside Park on 
Charles River in Newton and Weston. . .a 
face- lift and further development of 
Stony Brook Reservation in West Roxbury 
and Hyde Park. . .varied improvements and 
facilities at Constitution Beach in 
East Boston, Charlesbank Park in Boston's 
West End and Magazine Beach in Cambridge. 

Master plans for recreation projects 
under the capital outlay program and 
other improvements have been prepared 
by MDC ' s Planning Section. 

OPEN SPACE ACQUIRED 

Preserving and expanding open space 
for recreation has become more vital 
than ever to meet existing and prospec- 
tive needs. To that end MDC has acquir- 
ed 22 acres in a waterfront peninsula 
at Stodders Neck in Hingham and averted 
potential commercial development. For 
both recreation and flood control pur- 
poses, a plan is being implemented for 
taking 39 acres at Mother Brook in 







ENHANCING PARKS* and 
parkways is goal of tree 
program totaling 8000 
plantings in 1971-72. 



Boston's Readville section and Dedham. 
With a recent one-acre acquisition, MDC 
now owns 19.4 acres, including two mill 
ponds, a dam and adjacent land. In 
process, also, is the purchase of 30 
acres of surplus Federal land on the 
southerly end of Deer Island. During 
the year, the Commission purchased land 
to enlarge Breakheart Reservation, 
Cutler Park and the Charles River 
Reservation. 

While new facilities are essential to 
meeting growing recreational needs, new 
and more intensive activity programs 
also play an important role. The MDC 
has moved energetically in this direc- 
tion. 

Communities were encouraged to de- 
velop off-season, vacation-oriented pro- 
grams at rinks, rather than leave 
costly facilities idle. Figure-skating 
classes were expanded. Plans were laid 
for a street hockey tournament and a 
state-wide public links championship at 
Ponkapoag Golf Course. Nature walks 
were arranged at reservations. The 
free summer theatre on the Charles River 
extended its season into the winter 
months at the former premises of the 
Institute of Contemporary Arts. Fish- 
ing prospects were given a boost by a 
fish ladder built at Watertown Dam, the 




SAILS ALOFT in new 
sailing program for 
youngsters at Pleasure 
Bay, South Boston. 




REVIVAL OF RENTAL CANOEING is an objec- 
tive of planners who are drafting a program 
for greater recreation activity along 
Charles River. 



first of nine proposed fishways at dams 
extending to South Natick, and a shore 
fishing area was opened at the Marlboro 
end of Sudbury Reservoir. The 1971 
fishing season at Quabbin Reservoir saw 
attendance soar to 54,673 fishermen, an 
18% increase over 1970. Quabbin pro- 
duced the state's biggest landlocked 
salmon weighing 9 pounds, 5 ounces. 

A milestone in outdoor recreation was 
marked by plans for two sailing programs, 
one scheduled for opening in late summer 
of 1972 at Pleasure Bay, South Boston, and 
the other on the Somerville shore of 
Mystic River Basin for the 1973 season. 
Both are patterned after the highly- 
successful program on the Charles River 
Basin operated for MDC by Community 
Boating, Inc. 

A mixed and enlarged array of events 
drew 227,000 to Hatch Shell where 44 per- 
formances were scheduled, ranging from 
traditional Esplanade Pops concerts and a 
12-concert "Bach in the Basin" series to 
jazz, folk and barbershop quartet music, 
poetry and old-time movies. At beaches 
and park reservations there were 91 band 
concerts. 

For the first time, the turnout at 
skating rinks was over the 2 million mark, 
with a network of 20 rinks in service 



during the 1971-72 season. 

Public skating accounted for one-half 
the attendance. The remainder was largely 
for hockey sessions, supplemented by 
group lessons in figure-skating and speed- 
skating, school physical education 
classes, retarded children groups, 
hockey clinics and skating parties by 
organizations. 

To supply maximum hockey time, en- 
closed rinks operated for the second sea- 
son on a seven-months schedule and open 
air rinks for five months — a four to 
eight-week extension — running from 
5 A.M. to midnight at many rinks. Thus, 
both the season and the hours of opening 
have been lengthened. But the 1500 
hours available weekly still fell short 
of requests by 1000 hours. 

Bathing at 17 ocean beaches and four 
fresh-water swimming spots is the most 
popular summer-time activity, drawing 
well over 15 million, based on estimates. 
The network of swimming pools had an 
attendance of 357,000. 

Boston Harbor islands were busier than 
ever. More than 120,000 visitors flocked 
to historic Georges Island, a magnet for 
200 outings, nearly 100 camping groups and 
individuals arriving for the day on five 



boat lines. Nearby Lovell's Island, equip- 
ped with a new pier, drew about 45,000, 
including many campers and boat owners. 
Off the Hull shore Peddocks Island was 
host to 30 outings. The island, acquired 
in 1970, was available only on a permit 
basis, pending development of additional 
accommodations . 

FREE MUSEUM VISITS 

Recreation is linked with education in 
three ongoing programs for school systems 
in the Parks District offering classroom 
groups free museum visits and education- 
oriented films, lectures and demonstra- 
tions. 

At the Museum of Science 69,763 MDC- 
sponsored pupils participated in the 
learning and fun experience, ranging 
62 for Dover to 22,218 for Boston. The 
Children's Museum recorded 27,011 in 
school and community groups and Trailside 
Museum 9,653 for school visitors. Cost 
of the entire program was $156,750. 




Other activites included: 

Blue Hills Ski Area, 35,000 skiers and 
25,000 at ski school. 

Ponkapoag's 36-hole layout in Canton, 
96,468 golfers with a 550 average daily 
play and 844 on the largest single day's 
play; Martin Memorial's 18-hole course in 
Weston, 39,851, with an average of 195 
daily and 363 for the greatest day's 
attendance. 

Boston Children's Theatre Stagemobile, 
two plays at each of 10 locations during 
school vacation. 

Sailing pavilion on Charles River 
Basin, 1180 junior members and 2900 
seniors, equipped with 60 sailboats, six 
rowboats and three safety launches. 

Zoos - Franklin Park, Boston, esti- 
mated attendance 400,000; Walter D. Stone, 
Stoneham, 250,000; Franklin Park Children's 
Zoo, 154,759; Boston Zoological Society's 
Zoomobile, 193 appearances; MDC Traveling 
Zoo, 95 appearances during the summer 
season. 

Trailside Museum, Canton, 79,836. 



BIKE PATH running 4 1/2 miles 
on Cambridge side of Charles River 
has been completed. The bikeway 
eventually will extend nearly 20 
miles around the river basin for 
pleasure and commuter use. 

Publick Theatre's free performances - 
estimated attendance for summer season, 
10,000; abbreviated first winter season 
of 1971-72, 2500. 



With the approach of the new fiscal 
year beginning July 1, 1972, cutbacks in 
operation of pools, beaches, skating 
rinks and maintenance work were being 
devised to live within reduced funds voted 
by the Legislature as part of a general 
budget percentage freeze. 

Affected was a Parks District account 
of $4.6 million for temporary or seasonal 
employees and various other purposes which 
was cut 20 percent to $3.7 million. 
Further complicating the problem was the 
prospective opening of four new rinks and 
a year-round swimming pool, as well as 
the absorption of a 4.37o cost of living 
pay increase. 



10 




FAMED MEMORIAL DRIVE in Cambridge runs along tree- 
lined Charles River, preserving scenic parkway values. 



Traffic Relief, Safety Studies Advancing 



Smooth movement of vehicular traffic 
in Metropolitan Boston has been an elusive 
goal in the face of constantly mounting 
volume and peak-hour strain by commuting 
motorists. 

A major responsibility lies with the 
MDC which patrols and maintains many main 
arteries and parkways within Route 128 and 
provides policing of the Northeast, 
Central Artery and Southeast expressways. 

In the post-World War II period the 
MDC system was forced to absorb the great 
traffic growth pending implementation of 
the 1948 Master Highway plan for the 
Boston Metropolitan area. With solutions 
to heavy traffic volume moving in the 
direction of expanded mass transit instead 
of new expressways, MDC has continued a 
program of construction and planning to 
relieve existing bottlenecks and congested 
thoroughfares. 

A new $10.6 million bridge spanning 
Neponset River in Dorchester and Quincy 
was fully opened August 31, 1971, curing 
a critical trouble spot. Together with 
highway approach changes, the wider and 



higher 800-foot fixed span was designed 
to relieve South Shore traffic congestion 
and eliminate delays caused by a half- 
century-old drawbridge. 

The finishing touches were completed, 
also, for smoother and safer traffic flow 
on a 1 1/2-mile section of Soldiers Field 
Road, Brighton. A $2.5 million project 
between Eliot Circle and a point just 
beyond Western Avenue provided a median 
strip, wider roadway, new lighting, an 
underpass at Western Avenue and Arsenal 
Street and extensive landscaping. This 
is part of a continuous, divided parkway 
along Charles River from Leverett Circle 
in the West End to Brighton. 

Construction is proceeding on replace- 
ment of the worn-out 68-year-old Prison 
Point Bridge between East Cambridge and 
Charlestown, which was declared unsafe and 
torn down in 1970. Designs for the $3.9 
million project were completed by MDC and 
then turned over to the State Department 
of Public Works for construction, with 
100% Federal funding obtained by DPW 
under a railroad bridge replacement pro- 
gram. The four-lane structure is being 



11 



meshed into a redesigned Rutherford Avenue 
in Charlestown where DPW is completing 
major widening and other improvements. 

The bridge also ties in with a major 
traffic relief program for the Northern 
Artery system from East Cambridge to 
Wellington Circle, Medford. Plans and 
specifications are being prepared for 
MDC's first use of computer-controlled 
traffic signals, median strip and other 
upgrading of the 3 1/2 mile stretch. 

With heavily-traveled Morrissey 
Boulevard slated to become the automobile 
gateway to the new University of Massa- 
chusetts-Boston campus at Columbia Point, 
Dorchester, planning was initiated for 
an interchange system to ease a growing 
traffic crunch. 

Design work neared completion on a 
$4.2 million tunnel carrying south-bound 
vehicles from Kosciuszko Circle to the 
campus entrance to be built for MDC by 
the State Department of Public Works 
aided by Federal funds. Traffic improve- 
ments have also been developed for prob- 
lem areas in the 1 1/2-mile stretch be- 
tween the circle and Freeport Street, 
Dorchester, including possible widening. 

Traffic relief is planned, as well, 
for congestion between the North Station 
area and Charlestown by a roadway viaduct 
adjacent to the new Charles River Dam at 
the former Warren Avenue bridge site. 

Consultants have been engaged for study 
of traffic and safety improvements on two 



key roadways, Storrow Drive-Soldiers Field 
Road in Boston and Lynnway in Lynn. In- 
house study projects are proceeding for 
nearly a dozen other important thorough- 
fares. 

A severe problem has arisen from run- 
down and overburdened bridges which inspec- 
tors estimate require replacement or major 
repair of 17 structures among the MDC's 
110 highway, pedestrian and railroad 
bridges at an estimated cost of $17.5 
million. 

Among them are structures dating back 
to the horse and buggy days and others 
built for pleasure vehicles on parkway 
systems and later pressed into service for 
general traffic and trucking. Some of 
these critical structures are the Harvard, 
Wellington, Dorchester Bay and Columbia 
Road bridges. Work will be financed by 
allocations from existing and prospective 
state highway bond issues and Federal 
funds. 

As a vital adjunct to roadway construc- 
tion, MDC is carrying on a continuous pro- 
gram for improving its traffic light system 
and modernizing lighting for upgrading 
safety. 

To improve the pleasure qualities of 
travel on parkways an extensive tree- 
planting program has been initiated. In- 
creased attention is also being given to 
planning for recreational and commuter 
bicycling in response to the increased use 
of bicycles. 



Major Pollution Abatement Projects in Progress 



A new era in pollution abatement for 
Boston Harbor and river waters loomed dur- 
ing the 1972 fiscal year, marked by on- 
going projects and commitments to broader 
environmental goals. 

Far-reaching vistas opened up with the 
newly-enacted $110 million environmental 
capital outlay budget which earmarked $83 
million for more sophisticated sewage 
treatment techniques, diverting overflows 
and a comprehensive wastewater management 
and engineering study of needs to the 
year 2050. 



The objectives include: 

— Sludge disposal facilities and advan- 
ced wastewater treatment for the Deer 
Island and Nut Island treatment plants in 
Boston Harbor. 

— Pollution abatement projects such as 
relief and trunk sewers, pumping stations 
and treatment works to improve waters of 
Dorchester Bay. 

— Rehabilitation of tidegates in 



12 



-\ 



-*«&s- 




DEER ISLAND SEWAGE TREATMENT PLANT alleviating pollution in Boston 
Harbor consists of (1) administration building and laboratory, (2) 
pumping station, (3) power plant, (4) storage sphere for sewage gas 
used to operate plant, (5) sludge digestion tanks, (6) sludge and scum 
thickening tanks, (7) sedimentation and settling tanks, (8) chlorine 
building and (9) Winthrop Terminal headworks. Not shown are pumping 
station to supply cooling water for equipment, water storage reservoir 
and garage. 



East Boston and Charlestown, supplementing 
similar work under way on the Boston water- 
front to prevent salt water intrusion into 
the Boston and MDC sewerage systems. 

The program is expected to meet the 
wastewater treatment standards for Boston 
Harbor now required by the Federal Environ- 
mental Protection Agency. 

Separate funding earlier in the 1972 
legislative session provided $7 million 
for innovative clean water projects on 
Charles River. This supplements $13 
million authorized by 1971 legislation 
to alleviate overflows of combined storm 
water and sanitary sewage in the Charles 
River estuary by a system of conduits, 
treatment and pumping stations and dis- 
charge of treated effluent to tidewater 
beyond the projected new Charles River Dam. 

13 



Meanwhile, nearing completion was a 
comprehensive sewerage construction pro- 
gram costing $140 million over a 25-year 
period, a big head start on the kind of 
clean-water effort that many metropolitan 
centers are just beginning. 

The forward-looking projects tackled 
pollution from several directions... 
nearly 35 miles of big relief and trunk 
sewers to reduce overflows from mixed 
storm water and sewage, particularly 
along the Charles ... pre-treatment head- 
works in Roxbury, South Boston and Chelsea 
linked to two under-harbor tunnels about 
10 miles long. .. primary sewage treatment 
plants at Deer Island and Nut Island... 
the Winthrop Terminal headworks and pump- 
ing station serving Winthrop and Orient 
Heights in East Boston. . .a novel storm 
detention and chlorination station near 



B.U. Bridge on Charles River. 

The costly, time-consuming effort has 
shown encouraging results, especially 
since the 1968 activation of the Deer 
Island plant and year-round chlorination. 
Six Winthrop town beaches have reopened. 
Commercial shellfishing in three areas 
off Logan Airport and Winthrop have been 
revived. The outer harbor waters have 
shown improvement in appearance and 
quality, according to the State Water 
Pollution Control Division and the Depart- 
ment of Public Health. 

On the Charles, upgraded conditions 
have been reported, backed by a Federal 
evaluation which revealed reductions in 
coliform bacteria counts ranging from 
28% to 84% in four basic locations. 



A blow was dealt to a significant pollu- 
tion source — defective tidegates in 
Boston's main drainage system. Many were 
rehabilitated and others are proceeding to 
shut off millions of gallons of sea water 
intruding daily into the Boston and MDC 
sewer systems at high tide, diminishing 
normal capacity and flushing sewage into 
the harbor on each tide cycle. 

Modification of a pumping station was 
completed in a phase of the Squantum 
Force Main project, designed to end dis- 
charge of untreated sewage from Quincy's 
Squantum section. A 3 3/4-mile line will 
carry the flow to the Nut Island plant, 
diverting wastewater from Boston's Moon 
Island outlet. The facility is scheduled 
to be operative for the summer of 1973, 
when a remaining 400-foot section is 
finished. 



MYSTIC RIVER BASIN PROJECTS 

Progress has been made also on the 
Mystic River watershed, where work has 
begun on a $1.6 million clean-water 
project to carry off overflows of storm 
water and sanitary sewage discharging into 
the river basin from Somerville's combined 
sewerage system. The Somerville Marginal 
Conduit will be equipped with a facility 
for removing solids and chlorinating the 
flow prior to discharge at tidewater below 
Amelia Earhart Dam. The six-year-old dam 
has already upgraded the basin by control- 
ling its level, eliminating odorous tidal 
flats and diminishing salt water intrusion. 

Virtually finished was a dual-purpose 
$7.1 million flood control project and an 
adjoining interceptor trunk sewer on 
Saugus Branch Brook, Maiden, a tributary of 
Maiden River which in turn empties into 
Mystic River Basin. The work is designed 
to avert flooding and sewer line overflows. 
Substantially completed was the West End 
Brook flood control work, also in Maiden, 
under a $1.4 million contract. 

Removal of debris, vegetation and dred- 
ging along Alewife Brook from Cambridge to 
Mystic River was started, while treatment 
continued on Upper Mystic Lake for aquatic 
weeds, algae and chlorides. 

There was also continued activity for 
upgrading Boston Harbor waters. 



Alternatives for disposing of Deer 
Island sludge, now deposited in the 
outer harbor, were researched and de- 
scribed in a study report by an MDC 
Boston Harbor Pollution Task Force. The 
proposals formed the basis for later 
assignment of the design phase to a con- 
sultant engineering firm. 

CLEAN-WATER PROGRESS ON CHARLES 

A new-type anti-pollution weapon was 
activated on the Charles near the 
Cambridge side of B.U. Bridge — a storm 
detention and chlorination station with 
a capacity of 233 million gallons per day. 
The $4.7 million installation employs an 
advanced method of handling overflow of 
combined storm water and sewage. This 
provides for settling and chlorination 
before discharging effluent into the 
river and flushing solids from detention 
tanks into sewer lines for treatment at 
Deer Island. The plant was activated 43 
times during fiscal 1972, processing 280 
million gallons before discharge into the 
Charles. 

A further cutback of polluting overflows 
was assured by the continuing work on a 
huge North Charles relief sewer in 
Cambridge, with two of four sections under 
contract and a third ready to go. Upon 
completion, the line will stretch three 
miles from the vicinity of Mt. Auburn 
Hospital to Main Street at a cost of $11.5 
million, with a connection to the storm 
detention and chlorination plant. 



14 





WATERWAYS CLEANUP by volunteers ranged from scuba diving 
for underwater debris off Winthrop Beach to youths at work on 
Charles River shoreline, shown struggling with logs, lumber, 
tires, junk and litter. 



Volunteer Cleanups Show 
Environmental Concern 



Fresh attention was focussed on the 
clean waters goal with the creation of a 
Charles River Task Force, the $7 million 
funding in 1972 legislation and an immi- 
nent start by the Corps of Engineers on a 
new $41.8 million Charles River Dam. 



town of Holbrook became the 43rd member o 
the district and Weston decided to join 
the system in preference to an alternate 
proposal to build local facilities. Ten 
municipalities have been added to the 
district since 1945. 



The new bond issue will finance advanced 
concepts for attacking pollutants, including 
in-stream treatment of the basin through a 
chemical and sedimentation process, an 
aeration technique for upstream locations 
and other methods of combatting pollution. 

From the new Charles River Dam and its 
pumping station, being built in coopera- 
tion with MDC, will come more effective 
basin flood control and a remedy for salt 
water intrusion from the harbor into the 
lower basin, in addition to locks for 
relieving navigation congestion. 

Ecology- inspired demands for higher 
standards of wastewater disposal and 
treatment have stirred mounting interest 
in a tie-in with the Metropolitan Sewerage 
District by additional communities. The 

15 



Citizen concern over environmental con 
ditions has been dramatically reflected b 
a massive volunteer cleanup of debris, 
litter and junk along waterways and in pa 
reservations for the third successive yea 
On the Charles alone as many as 7,000 to 
10,000 dedicated persons have turned out, 
including youth and adult organizations 
and municipal and military personnel. 



The 1972 operation exploded into a 
state-wide spring offensive waged by 
Federal, State and community agencies and 
an army of volunteers, tackling rivers, 
beaches, parks and community areas. Offi- 
cials hailed the efforts in terms of an 
effective cleanup and creating a sense of 
public concern and involvement in the 
environmental battle. 



Growing Water Use Exceeds Watershed Supply 



The MDC is running short of water, for 
consumers are using 21.6 million gallons 
per day (mgd) more than the system's 300 
mgd safe yield. Projections indicate the 
supply could be exhausted by 1984 based on 
the continuing rise in consumption and aver- 
age precipitation. 

But preliminary work is progressing to 
replenish the principal supply source at 
the giant Quabbin Reservoir and meet needs 
of the next decade by flood-skimming about 
1% of the Connecticut River's excess freshet 
flow that would otherwise be wasted in the 
Atlantic Ocean. Other river-tapping sources 
are under study to satisfy demands well into 
the '90's, even with anticipated growth of 
the Water District. 



Official findings and scientific stud- 
ies have concluded that tapping the 
Connecticut River under stipulated condi- 
tions would have no adverse effect on its 
flow, the river valley nor the environ- 
ment. Ecological studies of reservoirs 
and rivers are continuing to further 
assess the impact of river-tapping. 

A report filed with the Legislature 
during the year indicated that long- 
range needs may rise from 321 mgd to 
475 mgd through 1990. This was based on 
the prospect of supplementing local 
sources of 41 communities in addition 
to 32 members of the Metropolitan Water 
District and 10 others served under spe- 
cial agreements. 



Quabbin has never recovered from the 
devastating 1961-66 drought which plunged 
its level to 44.9% of capacity. High point 
since then was only 70.7% reached in June 
of 1972. 



AQUEDUCT WORK NEAR 

The river- skimming plan will boost the 
MDC annual supply by an average of 72 mgd 
— almost 25% of the current safe yield. 
The $35 million project provides for a 
10-mile aqueduct linking Quabbin with the 
Northfield Mt. pumped storage reservoir 
built by Northeast Utilities for hydro- 
electric power production. Details of an 
agreement with Northeast are being final- 
ized. 

The Northfield project was approved by 
legislative action in 1967 but it was 
delayed by controversy in the river valley, 
legal complications, the need for additional 
funding and negotiations with Northeast 
Utilities. 

Meanwhile, much of the groundwork has 
been completed for an expected construction 
start in 1973 and a target completion date 
of 1978. Preliminary steps have included 
aerial surveys, mapping, field work, engin- 
eering studies of the aqueduct route, bor- 
ings and right of way requirements. 

16 



Under law, the MDC must admit to the 
Water District any community within 10 
miles of the State House and any other 
municipality within 15 miles which the 
Commission "can reasonably supply with 
water." Eight of the 41 potential mem- 
bers are within 10 miles, 23 in the 
10-15-mile zone and 10 are beyond 15 
miles with no option other than MDC for 
future supply. MDC is also authorized 
to sell water to communities which can 
be readily served because of their prox- 
imity to storage reservoirs and aqueducts, 



MORE FLOOD -SKIMMING AHEAD 

Additional sources listed in the re- 
port included flood-skimming the Tully 
River watershed to supply Quabbin and in- 
creasing yield from the MDC Sudbury River 
system, subject to treatment of freshet 
flows. The report pointed out the possi- 
bility of eventually tapping Merrimack 
River, also requiring treatment. It has 
been suggested, too, that the Millers 
River be cleaned up and used as a supply 
for Quabbin. 

A clear-cut blueprint for the long- 
range future has been assured by a $1 
million allocation in the 1972 Environ- 
mental Capital Outlay Budget for compre- 
hensive study and planning. 




QUABBIN RESERVOIR'S GRANDEUR bordered by forests 
and hills is shown here in part from the Enfield 
Lookout. The reservoir is 17.9 miles long and 39.4 
square miles in area. 



No less vital than water supply is 
MDC's distribution network which is grow- 
ing steadily to keep pace with mounting 
demand . 

A major step in this direction is the 
$19.1 million Dorchester Tunnel, now in 
its final construction phase, extending 
seven miles from the City Tunnel at 
Chestnut Hill to Dorchester Lower Mills. 
Excavation was finished during the spring 
of 1972 and concrete lining is in progress 

Another big pipeline project neared 
completion in Medford and Somerville. The 
$4.4 million job provided for tunneling 
and laying of a 48-inch water main running 
2.8 miles to expand quantity and reinforce 
pressure for 325,000 residents of Medford, 
Somerville, Arlington, Belmont and Cam- 
bridge. 

Preparation of an agreement to admit 
the city of Woburn to the Water District 
brought plans for still another signifi- 
cant addition to the distribution system 
estimated at $4 million. The proposed 
facilities call for a pumping station 
in Stoneham on the westerly side of Spot 
Pond Reservoir and sufficient capacity 
for eventually serving the towns of 
Reading and North Reading. The line 



17 



will provide connections to fill future 
needs of Stoneham and Wakefield, which 
are already district members. 

Woburn becomes the 33rd member of 
the district. The 34th member is ex- 
pected to be the town of Wellesley, 
which has voted to apply for entry. 

A study was completed on the feas- 
ibility of extending the MDC water 
system to supply the towns of Avon, 
Braintree, Holbrook, Randolph, 
Stoughton and Weymouth and increase 
the supply already being provided to 
Canton. The report, which was pre- 
pared under the terms of 1969 legis- 
lation, is now being moved toward 
implementation. 

Growth in the size of oil tankers 
using Chelsea River has required replace- 
ment of one of the two under-river water 
lines serving East Boston. This is an 
intricate $1.3 million project to install 
a 36-inch water main at a lower level in 
the ship channel, being built under super- 
vision of the Water Division. It involves 
temporary bypasses to avoid interruption 
of supply to East Boston. 

In another facet of Metropolitan Water 



District operations, an engineering study 
has begun to determine the best method of 
fluoridating the system. 

Early estimates indicate capital expen- 
ditures for buildings and equipment will 
cost $700,000, while expense of chemicals 
and operating the fluoridation process 
amount to approximately $300,000 annu- 
ally. Fluoridation is expected to cost a 
fraction of what it would cost if each of 
the cities and towns fluoridated individu- 
ally. 

The fluoridation decision followed a 
request for an opinion by the Attorney 
General who ruled that MDC must fluori- 
date its water supply in view of favor- 
able action by a majority of Boards of 
Health in the Water District. Health 



officials in 28 of the member communities 
have gone on record for fluoridation. 

Still unresolved is the need of a 
pay-as-you-go method of meeting Water 
District costs, rather than the prac- 
tice of piling up debt and interest obli- 
gations to defray annual deficits. The 
existing water rate system has resulted 
in interest payments on 30-year refinan- 
cing bonds that have equalled the origi- 
nal principal, amounting by June, 1972, 
to over $90 million in bond indebtedness. 
MDC is renewing previous legislative pro- 
posals to hike the water rate from $120 
per million gallons to $160 and to return 
to a modified pay-as-you-go system by 
allowing for an increase or decrease of 
the rate by $5 in any year as required to 
keep income and costs in balance. 



Police Cope With Problems Posed by Changing Times 



From its inception in 1893 as an arm of 
the Metropolitan Parks District, the MDC 
Police has evolved in modern times into a 
highly-specialized agency, designed to 
cope with a changing society. 

Confronting the 600-man police force in 
the past year were by-products of these 
changes — civil disturbances, a formid- 
able narcotic drug problem, greater needs 
for assistance on the part of other police 
departments, public desire for more pro- 
f essionalization and growing traffic con- 
gestion, along with the traditional task 
of security for the vast MDC recreational, 
sewerage and water properties. 

Drastic measures were taken to deal 
with the burgeoning drug situation. 
Young officers were transformed into a 
kind of "mod squad" unit, enlarged to 12 
men and supplemented by a sergeant and 
six narcotics agents. 

Appropriate clothes, hair styles and 
mannerisms shielded their identity as the 
undercover men infiltrated the drug- 
pushing apparatus, scoring impressively 
in MDC jurisdiction and following trails 
into various communities. 



The disguised officers were pressed 
into service by nine communities as out- 
siders to foil recognition. One youthful 
undercover man enrolled for several months 
as a high school student, making numerous 
buys in and out of school, climaxed by a 
roundup of pushers. 

Undercover operations piled up over 
100 arrests in various cities and towns 
and 294 more in MDC jurisdiction during 
the year. Police also alerted the Federal 
Bureau of Narcotics and Dangerous Drugs 
and participated in raids with the agency. 

TACTICAL FORCE TRAINED 

The role of MDC Police as a back-up 
force for other departments was under- 
scored by a record of 1,107 assists, 
ranging from large mobilization of man- 
power for disturbances to accidents, 
traffic tieups, fires and emergencies 
requiring the K-9 and scuba underwater 
recovery units. 

In preparation for response to disorders 
and major emergencies 300 men have been 
given a week's training to produce a spec- 
ialized tactical force with courses running 



18 




READY FOR ACTION - Tactical 
force lines up for crowd control 
duty in Government Center disorder. 

the gamut from mob psychology and riot for- 
mations to techniques of restraint and 
police behavior. 

The unit was called upon for aid at 
campus disturbances, demonstrations in the 
Government Center and State House area, out- 
breaks at Deer Island House of Correction 
and a youth detention facility, and other 
disorders. 

Another impact of the changing times 
was felt by the curriculum and intensity 
of training at the MDC Police Academy. To 
keep pace with new demands on policemen, 
classroom work was expanded to such diver- 
sified subjects as explosives, sniper coun- 
ter-measures and ecology. More intensive 
training was given in psychology, particu- 
larly applying to mentally-disturbed per- 
sons, drugs and community relations. The 
course for rookies was expanded from 10 
weeks to 12 weeks at the academy and four 
on the job, although state law requires 
only 10 weeks. Annual one-week in-ser- 
vice programs were carried on for experi- 
enced policemen and a new supervisory 
training course sharpened ranking offi- 
cers. Eight new officers from other de- 
partments were trained, bringing to 158 
the number of outsiders graduated from the 
academy since it became a regional 
training school in 1966. 

In progress was a far-reaching manage- 
ment study of the operational and admin- 
istrative setup under a consultant con- 

19 



MOUNTED PATROL officers provide 
surveillance of bridle paths, foot 
trails and other park facilities. 

tract to obtain recommendations for plan- 
ning and research functions and a central 
records system. 

A new look in equipment is also devel- 
oping. Recently-acquired items designed 
for more sophisticated police work include 
a self-contained coimunications van, satel- 
lite receivers, a mobile generator and four 
vans for highway enforcement, safety and 
accident emergencies. The vans carry de- 
vices for first aid and rescue, in-depth 
investigation and a new method of vehicle 
speed measurement. 

Reflecting the scope of the police 
mission, statistics show crimes against 
property, such as automobile thefts, 
larceny and vandalism at 1,8^2, motor 
vehicle accidents 5,755, recovery of 
stolen and lost property $1,473,645, 
total crimes 4,312 and arrests 2,182. 

A breathalyzer test for suspected drun- 
ken driving cases was offered to 227 oper- 
ators. As provided by law, 160 exercised 
the option of refusing the test, subjecting 
them to automatic suspension of their dri- 
ver's license and court charges. Sixty- 
three consented to the test, which provided 
evidence for court appearances. Four were 
cleared by the test and released. 

The K-9 unit was called out on 60 occa- 
sions, including 45 assists to other police 
departments, and the scuba unit 32 times, 
25 of these at the request of various 
police forces. 



MDC Operations Run By Commission, Six Divisions 



The Metropolitan District Commission's 
concept is based on the belief that com- 
munities in Metropolitan Boston can der- 
ive greater benefits with more efficiency 
and lower costs through regional opera- 
tion of parks, water and sewerage systems, 

Its origin was the Metropolitan Sewer- 
age Commission created in 1889 as the 
nation's first legally-constituted metro- 
politan district. Then came the Metropol- 
itan Parks District in 1893 and the Metro- 
politan Water Board in 1895. The three 
agencies were consolidated into the Metro- 
politan District Commission in 1919 for 
greater efficiency and economy. 

Operations are governed by a five-mem- 
ber Commission appointed by the Governor. 
The Commissioner serves as full-time exec- 
utive and administrative head of the agen- 
cy. The four Associate Commissioners 
attend weekly meetings to set policy, ap- 
prove contracts and participate in deci- 
sions on departmental operations. The 
Commissioner and Associate Commissioners 
each have an equal vote, except that 
"concurrence of the Commissioner and of 
not less than two Associate Commissioners 
shall be required for the execution of 
contracts and of such other official act- 
ions of the Commission as may be required 
by law." 

Under the Reorganization Act of 1969 
establishing a cabinet system, MDC has 
been under the jurisdiction of Secretary 
of Environmental Affairs Charles H.W. 
Foster, who serves as "the executive 
officer of the Governor for accomplishing 
the purposes of his executive office." 

In addition to central administrative 
functions, the MDC is presently organized 
into six operational divisions: Water, 
Sewerage, Engineering, Parks and Recrea- 
tion, Parks Engineering and Police. 



A Right of Way Section performs legal 
aspects of land takings, easements and 
conveyances. A Planning Section is pri- 
marily concerned with park and recrea- 



tional development, roadway system impro- 
vements, landscaping and open space acqui- 
sition. A Financial Division operates a 
data-processing unit for payroll and 
other departmental uses, processes all 
receipts and disbursements, maintains 
fiscal records and serves as the depart- 
ment's accounting office. 

ENGINEERING DIVISION 

The Engineering Division (formerly 
Construction Division) is responsible 
for planning, engineering and constructing 
projects for the Water and Sewerage Dis- 
tricts and flood control. The completed 
facilities are turned over to the opera- 
ting divisions for maintenance and oper- 
ation. 

Twenty-five contracts were in various 
stages of construction during fiscal 1972, 
totaling $45,631,840. 

Awarded in this period were 10 con- 
tracts amounting to $6,153,835. They 
included two for the water system at 
$183,819, six for sewage disposal or 
pollution control, $5,859,681 and two 
for flood control, $110,335. 

Fifteen were previously awarded and 
still in progress or completed for a 
total of $39,478,005. Two were for water 
supply totaling $23,477,290, three for 
flood control, $6,909,237, and 10 for 
sewage disposal or pollution control, 
$9,091,526. 

WATER DIVISION 

The purpose of the Water Division is to 
provide a sufficient supply of pure water 
to member communities in the Metropolitan 
Water District and such other cities and 
towns as can be reasonably supplied. 
Twenty-five communities receive their 
entire supply and seven a partial supply, 
with an area of 309 square miles and a 
population of 1,874,000. Arrangements 
have been made to admit the City of 
Woburn as the 33rd member. Ten communi- 
ties in Central Massachusetts located near 



20 



MDC reservoirs and aqueducts are supplied 
under special agreements. 

The Water District's sources are the 
Quabbin, Wachusett and Sudbury watersheds 
and the runoff of certain flood periods 
in the Ware River watershed. Storage 
reservoirs on these watersheds have a 
capacity of 495 billion gallons, princi- 
pally at Quabbin Reservoir with its capa- 
city of 412 billion gallons and Wachu- 
sett' s 67 billion gallons. 

The water supply is delivered to Metro- 
politan Boston through 121 miles of aque- 
ducts and distributed via 260 miles of 
pipe lines, almost entirely by gravity 
flow. 

Facilities under control of the Water 
Division include six storage reservoirs 
with 467 square miles of tributary water- 
shed, a water surface of 30,000 acres, 
four hydroelectric power stations, 16 
miles of high tension power transmission 
lines, 12 distribution pumping stations 
to service high elevations and 16 dis- 
tribution reservoirs with a capacity of 
3.1 billion gallons. 

Nine contracts totaling $1,214,362 
were awarded, including a $1,149,637 
project to relocate a large water main 
under Chelsea River between Chelsea and 
East Boston. The other work dealt with 
various maintenance and repair require- 
ments . 

SEWERAGE DIVISION 

The intricate sewerage system and treat- 
ment process are under the jurisdiction of 
the Sewerage Division. Its functions 
require maintenance and operation of 12 
pumping stations, two treatment plants, 
four pretreatment headworks, a detention 
and chlorination station for combined 
storm water and sewage overflows along 
Charles River Basin and 225 miles of 
trunk sewers. 



Forty-two cities and towns serviced by 
the Sewerage District have a total of 
4,921 miles of local sewers connected to 
MDC trunk sewers at 1,805 locations, an 
increase of 86 miles over the previous 
year. Wastewater from 389,216 individual 



connections flow through municipal lines 
into MDC trunk sewers, an increase of 
4,236 over the previous year. 

Average sewage load was 457 million 
gallons per day, passing through primary 
treatment at Deer Island and Nut Island 
plants for chlorination and other treat- 
ment before discharge into outer Boston 
Harbor through 10 outfalls. 

Holbrook became a member of the 
district in January, 1971, but is not 
contributing sewage to the system as yet. 

There were 10 contracts awarded or in 
force for maintenance and repairs, 
totaling $96,445. 

PARKS -RECREATION DIVISION 

MDC ' s newest division is Parks and 
Recreation, formed in 1970 by combining 
operation and maintenance of park 
reservations, recreational facilities 
and roadways with the Recreation Section. 
Previously, operation and maintenance 
functions were administered by district 
captains of MDC Police. The new agency 
subsequently also took over the Locks 
and Drawbridge Section from Parks 
Engineering Division. 

Now the largest division in MDC, Parks 
and Recreation's responsibilities 
include five major reservations, 17 miles 
of beaches, 21 skating rinks, 17 swim- 
ming pools, three 18-hole golf courses, 
168 miles of roadway, 12,500 acres of 
parkland and a wide variety of other 
recreational facilities. The division 
also has administrative and maintenance 
responsibilities for zoos. 



PARKS ENGINEERING DIVISION 



Principal function of Parks Engineering 
Division is to provide engineering serv- 
ices for construction, major repairs and 
alterations for park facilities, road- 
ways, bridges, locks, drawbridges, street 
and other lighting systems and traffic 
lights . 

New facilities are designed and con- 
structed under supervision of the 
division and turned over to Parks and 



21 



Recreation for operation and routine 
maintenance upon completion. 

Ninety-nine contracts were awarded, 
in progress or completed at a cost of 
$18,572,165. 



POLICE DIVISION 

Primary mission of the Police Division 
is protection of MDC property and people 
using its facilities and patrol of 186 
miles of MDC roadways and the Northeast, 
Southeast and Central Artery expressways 
maintained by the State Department of 
Public Works. The division also has full 
police powers in any community where 
MDC has property. 

Its broad responsibility for law 
enforcement at parklands, waterways, 
harbor islands and roadways has led to 
highly-diversified functions and equip- 
ment. Among them are K-9 , scuba, 
detective, bomb disposal and narcotic 
units, a tactical force, regional 
police academy, a fleet of patrol boats, 
mounted policemen, breathalyzers, radar 
and other highway safety and enforce- 
ment devices. 

MDC Police plays an important role 



in assisting local police departments 
in certain contingencies, particularly 
requiring specialized training or 
equipment and greater manpower. 



RIGHT OF WAY FUNCTIONS 

The legal aspects of land takings, 
easements and conveyances are performed 
by the Right of Way Section, which 
completed 81 transactions in the past 
year. 

Twelve of these were orders of taking 
for recreational, flood control, sewer and 
water line purposes. There were 69 con- 
veyances and miscellaneous matters, such 
as granting permits, easements, deeds, 
leases and various other types of instru- 
ments . 

The section is also responsible for 
an enforcement unit which handles 
encroachments on MDC lands, pollution 
of rivers and streams and other similar 
violations . 

Among other responsibilities are 
compiling an inventory of MDC lands and 
relocation of displaced property owners, 
tenants and businesses. 




MDC Finances 

As a regional public agency, the Metropolitan District Commission is financed 
primarily by assessments on 54 communities which are members of one or more of its 
three districts - 37 in Parks, 32 Water and 43 Sewerage. 

Additional money comes from the State Highway Fund, State General Fund, state 
allocations for certain flood control projects and miscellaneous revenue such as fees, 
rentals, licenses, permits, fines, penalties, sales, Federal reimbursements or grants, 
etc. 



The operating budget and bond issues for capital construction are subject to 
approval by the Legislature and Governor. 

22 



Principal financing sources for the three districts are the following: 

PARKS - Recreational capital construction by bond issues, amortized by assessments 
based on property tax valuations of communities in the district; maintenance of boul- 
evards and reservations and police costs by 60$ from the State Highway Fund, 1% from 
the State's General Fund and 39$ by member cities and towns with one-third based on 
population and two-thirds on valuation; highway and bridge construction by legislative 
allocations from state highway bond issues. 

WATER - Charge of $120 per million gallons, with special provisions for communities 
outside the Water District. 

SEWERAGE - Debt requirements apportioned on the basis of capacity of municipal 
sewers connected to MDC sewerage system; maintenance expense assessed on the basis of 
population. 

During the fiscal year which started July 1, 1971, and ended June 30, .1972, the 
Commission spent $39,586,201 on maintenance and operations. The sum of $21,102,93U 
was paid for interest and retirement of bonds issued for capital projects and bonds 
to cover water fund deficits. The combined expenditure was $60,689,135. 

Additionally, $8,OOU,076 was expended for highway construction and certain flood 
control projects allocated from state highway bond issues and other special author- 
izations. These are financed by state funds rather than assessments on MDC cities 
and towns. 

The $68,693,211 total represented 57$ for maintenance and operations, 31$ for pay- 
ment on bonded debt and 12$ for expenditures from state bond funds not assessed on 
MDC cities and towns. 



EXPENDITURES 



1972 



1971 



Operations 



Debt 



Operations 



Debt 



Admini strati on 
* Parks 
Sewerage 
Water 

Total 



$756,089 

2h,592,653 

6,8Ul,356 



7,396,103 
$39,586,201 



$U, 150, 376 
7,350,5U5 
9,602,013 



$21,102,93u 
$60,689,135 



$716,21^ 

22,80U,982 

6,397,027 

6,729,8U6 



^,099,051 
6,780,9U3 
8,830,889 



$36,6U8,099 $19,710,883 

$56,358,982 



^-Includes cost of MDC Police operations. 

Note - An additional $8,OOU,076 was spent in 1972 and $7,6Ul,5U7 in 1971 
for highway construction projects financed by state highway bond issues 
and flood control and other special authorizations financed by General 
Fund bond issues rather than assessments on MDC cities and towns. 



23 





PRINCIPAL 


INCOME SOURCES 






1972 


1971 




Parks 


$12,608,369 


$12,OU8,2£L 


37 Cities & Towns 


Sewerage 


* 1^,797,188 


12,221,298 


U3 Cities & Towns 


Water 


12,512,U2U 


11,362,163 


32 Cities & Towns 


State 
Highway- 
Fund 


15,039,780 


1U,6U2,830 




State 

General 

Fund 


220,lU8 


203,265 




Revenue 

Uri 4-nw 


2,767,888 


2,UoU,5U8 


Admissions, Sales, 
Fees, etc. 


water 

Deficit 

Bonds 


3,680,000 


3,510,000 




Total 


$62,625,797 


$56,392,355 





* Includes deferred assessment of $L,729,U5U 

The Commission continues its efforts to operate managed resources in a business- 
like manner. It bears repetition that MDC f s sale of power, licenses, fees, con- 
cession permits, etc., do not accrue to the Commission for re-use, but rather flow 
directly into the appropriate fund and thereby reduces assessments against cities 
and towns. Federal reimbursements ordinarily have the same effect. 

Largest expenditure of the Commission has been, as always, personnel, shown as 
follows: 



*NUMBER OF PERSONNEL 




EXPENDITURES 




1972 


1971 


1970 


1972 


1971 


1970 


Admini strati on 


66 


68 


67 


$5UU,m 


$539,U57 


$535,058 


Engineering 


268 


2U6 


201 


2,9UO,U38 


2,U82,U21 


2,165, 68U 


Highway Eng. 


Uli 


hk 


39 


U27,007 


387,581 


398,255 


Parks & 
Parks Eng. 


167U 


1981 


2018 


9,1U8,U72 


8,668, 8U8 


7,7U7,825 


Police 


613 


625 


626 


6,931,721 


6,363,563 


5,135,19U 


Sewerage 


U56 


U66 


U57 


U,336,135 


U,132,322 


3,760,033 


Water 


608 


635 


620 


U,916,15U 


U,6U3,978 


U,396,9U8 


Total 


3729 


U065 


U028 


$29,2UU,038 


$27,218,170 


$2^,138,997 


* Includes 


permanent, temporary 


and seasonal 

24 


employees as 


of June 30. 



Finally, a word must be said about the debt structure for which MDC is responsible. 
Although there has been a flattening trend in terms of construction in recent years, 
there will soon again be substantial increases caused by the Water Division's major 
new Dorchester Tunnel and the Northfield-Quabbin Reservoir aqueduct for diverting 
excess Connecticut River water. In addition, ongoing wastewater studies, accompanied 
by strong pressure from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency will compel a costly 
upgrading of the Deer Island and Nut Island sewerage treatment systems. 

When these prospects are combined with the steady climb in water deficit-financing 
bonds, it will be seen that the current debt is already overheavy and that its future 
condition is somewhat alarming. 

A significant factor in the Water Fund indebtedness has been the issuance of long- 
term bonds to cover annual deficits, a procedure instituted by law in 19U6 and respon- 
sible for borrowing $9u million in obligations by 1972, of which $5U million is cur- 
rently outstanding. Interest payments have practically doubled the cost of payments 
on deficit debt. A pay-as-you-go system to end this practice has been urged in the 
past by MDC and the proposal will again be filed with the 1973 Legislature. 

OUTSTANDING DEBT, JUNE 30 
(In millions of dollars) 





Sewerage 


* Water 


Parks 


Total 


1972 


$95-555 


$129,285 


$U0.353 


$265,193 


1971 


93.659 


117.663 


37.128 


2U8.U50 


1970 


89.568 


113.536 


39.353 


2U2.U57 


1969 


88.9U2 


11U.509 


39.856 


2U3.307 


1968 


91.889 


116.987 


39.139 


2U8.015 



* Includes Water Fund deficit debt. 



25 



TOTAL ASSESSMENTS FOR METROPOLITAN DISTRICTS FOR 1971 






Metropolitan 


Metropolitan Parks 


Metropolitan 




Cities and Towns 




Water 


and Boulevards 


Sewerage System 


Total 


Arlington 




296,808.48 


296,003.54 


336,459.77 


929,271.79 


Ashland 








32,258.97 


32,258.97 


Belmont 




113,364.84 


227,553.44 


155,479.22 


496,397.50 


Boston 




6,205,719.96 


4,155,277.07 


4,557,773.20 


14,918,770.23 


Braintree 






173,091.26 


165,829.53 


338,920.79 


Brookline 




323,057.76 


503,740.79 


300,188.41 


1,126,986.96 


Burlington 








93,426.27 


93,426.27 


Cambridge 




42,880.80 


640,265.42 


928,811.27 


1,611,957.49 


Canton 




38,608.80 


69,261.27 


95,186.21 


203,056.28 


Chelsea 




159,154.68 


147,285.05 


256,132.82 


562,572.55 


Cohasset 






2,516.98 




2,516.98 


Dedham 






160,291.68 


184,444.24 


344,735.92 


Dover 






28,646.08 




28,646.08 


Everett 




350,928.00 


387,997.59 


294,655.01 


1,033,580.60 


Framingham 








238,837.26 


238,837.26 


Hingham 






95,991.60 


39,931.01 


135,922.61 


Hull 






65,961.07 




65,961.07 


Lexington 




197,476.32 




175,329.18 


372,805.50 


Lynn 






578,707.88 




578,707.88 


Lynnfield Water District 


13,772.76 






13,772.76 


Maiden 




302,997.96 


292,599.90 


314,355.62 


909,953.48 


Marblehead 




97,949.40 






97,949.40 


Medford 




353,905.56 


332,777.89 


485,221.27 


1,171,904.72 


Melrose 




131,472.96 


187,326.58 


243,507.86 


562,307.40 


Milton 




110,969.52 


193,944.79 


222,461.85 


527,376.16 


Nahant 




24,555.48 


23,948.69 




48,504.17 


Natick 








148,149.77 


148,149.77 


Needham 




45,511.20 


185,569.23 


166,469.66 


397,550.09 


Newton 




508,809.96 


708,171.09 


643,815.22 


1,860,796.27 


Norwood 




168,342.00 




147,195.51 


315,537.51 


Peabody 




25,695.72 






25,695.72 


Quincy 




448,599.60 


569,239.01 


575,614.66 


1,593,453.27 


Randolph 








112,481.61 


112,481.61 


Reading 








82,711.42 


82,711.42 


Revere 




173,016.96 


205,557.16 


210,389.63 


588,963.75 


Saugus 




130,132.56 


109,687.53 




239,820.09 


Somerville 




469,563.72 


457,396.37 


527,845.27 


1,454,805.36 


Stoneham 




137,461.08 


97,447.96 


118,685.87 


353,594.91 


Stoughton 








80,566.03 


80,566.03 


Swampscott 




71,553.84 


43,203.94 




114,757.78 


Wakefield 




120,597.60 


136,031.64 


145,251.18 


401,880.42 


Walpole 








72,491.10 


72,491.10 


Waltham 




472,492.32 


318,090.72 


325,830.42 


1,116,413.46 


Watertown 




209,179.92 


253,147.25 


233,459.51 


695,786.68 


Wellesley 






225,994.75 


132,886.44 


358,881.19 


Weston 




31,446.72 


74,743.44 




106,190.16 


Westwood 






67,726.29 


65,520.64 


133,246.93 


Weymouth 






330,854.49 


264,198.96 


595,053.45 


Wilmington 








64,371.21 


64,371.21 


Winchester 




30,794.40 


156,065.77 


206,752.21 


393,612.38 


Winthrop 




79,148.28 


106,253.83 


129,476.57 


314,878.68 


Woburn 








263,998.64 


263,998.64 


* $11,885,969.16 


$12,608,369.04 


$13,838,450.50 


$38,332,788.70 


Note: 


Assessments for 1971 


were received in fiscal 


1972. 




■K-Assessment for water 


consumption 


only. 





26 



DISTRICT MEMBERSHIP 



Arlington 


X 


Ashland 




Belmont 


X 


Bedford 




Boston 


X 


Braintree 




Brookline 


X 


Burlington 




Cambridge 


X 


Canton 


X 


Chelsea 


X 


Cohasset 




Dedham 




Dover 




Everett 


X 


Framingham 




Hingham 




Holbrook 




Hull 




Lexington 


X 


Lynn 




Lynnf ield 




Water Dist. 


X 


Maiden 


X 


Marblehead 


X 


Medford 


X 


Melrose 


X 


Milton 


X 


Nahant 


X 


Natick 




Needham 


X 


Newton 


X 


Norwood 


X 


Peabody 


X 


Quincy 


X 


Randolph 




Reading 





Water Parks Sewerage 



Water Parks Sewerage 



x 



x 

X 

X 

X 
X 

X 
X 

X 
X 
X 



Revere 


X 


X 


Saugus 


X 


X 


Somerville 


X 


X 


S toneham 


X 


X 


Stoughton 






Swampscott 


X 


X 


Wakefield 


X 


X 


Walpole 






Waltham 


X 


X 


Water town 


X 


X 


Wellesley 




X 


Weston 


X 


X 


Westwood 




X 


Weymouth 




X 


Wilmington 






Winchester 


X 


X 


Winthrop 


X 


X 


Woburn 







Totals 



32 



37 



x 

X 

X 

X 
X 
X 
X 
X 

X 

X 
X 
X 
X 

X 

43 



(Beyond the Water District the 
MDC furnishes the entire water 
supply for Chicopee, South 
Hadley Fire District No. 1 and 
Wilbraham, a partial supply to 
Clinton, Framingham, Leominster, 
Marlboro, Northboro and Southboro 
and an emergency standby connection 
for Worcester.) 

Membership 

3 Districts 23 
2 Districts 12 
1 District 19 

54 



27 




Note: Woburn was admitted to Water District August 9, 1972, 
but received no supply pending construction of a new 
pipeline and pumping station. 



28